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Three Essential Research Steps for a Public Relations Campaign

06 Nov

I recently conducted research for one of my PR classes, and it made me think about my future in the public relations field. The question asked was, “What are the key elements of a research campaign?” I thought it would be a simple question, but I  stopped to think about how I would do this in a real setting.

The key elements of a research program for a public relations campaign are the examination of the client, examination of the stakeholder and problem opportunity research.

1. Examination of Client

Client research, according to “Public Relations: A Values-Driven Approach”, should be focused on “discovering an organization’s size; the nature of the products or services it offers; and its history, staffing requirements, market and customers, budget legal environment, reputation and beliefs about the issue in question.” Extensive  research is necessary to ensure a public relations campaign aligns with the client’s strengths and reputation. In my opinion, the more a public relations practitioner knows about their client, the better the campaign will be and crisis events will dramatically decrease.

2. Examination of Stakeholder

Stakeholder research concentrates on any public’s who are important to the success of the client. This is an important step because many public relations campaigns have been discredited due to poor examination of their stakeholders. An example of this is the Nestle baby food controversy, which occurred in the 1970’s. Many children in non-English speaking countries were given Nestle baby formula by their parents, who were not able to read the instructions properly and were unintentionally providing inadequate nutrition to their children. The lack of stakeholder research for non-English speaking countries, in relation to Nestle, has made the organization suffer from negative publicity in the present day.

3. Problem-Opportunity Research

Problem-opportunity research focuses on what stake does the client’s organization have on a particular issue. It essentially looks for the reason that a client should act or react in a certain scenario. Its like if an animal spots a predator. It has to decide whether the best course of action is to run, fight, or do nothing in hopes the predator will allow the animal to go unnoticed. An organization examines its course of action in a similar way, by determining what it stands to lose or gain by participating on an issue.

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Posted by on November 6, 2011 in Public Relations, ROI

 

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